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Posts Tagged ‘field notes’

“Lent suggests life is more like a narrative than an outline. It does not remove blurry lines. Lent may provide some answers, but also new questions. Lent allows topics to overlap with one another. Although it is a temptation to separate one from the other. Lent reminds us of the reality that everyday topics intersect with big picture topics. We seem to have a natural inability to balance our focus of the kingdom of heaven with the details of earth. We are not to solve these dilemmas. Instead, we accept them and encourage others to see reality, to recognize the kingdom in the midst of these mundane and ordinary parts of our schedules. Lordship and dominion intersect with everyday tasks. The Word of the Lord meets the ink of our Day-timer.”

Participant: Field Notes from Here and Now, p.49

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“Time in the Gospel will remind us we aren’t the first to look at beauty and pronounce it good.We aren’t the first to find ourselves up to our elbows in a creative moment. We aren’t the first to roll away a stone to reveal what is behind it. After time in the Gospel, we might come out wide-eyed, muddy, bloody, and elbow deep in our story, excited to tell others where we have been and what we have discovered.”

From Participant: Field Notes from Here and Now, p.48

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A quote from Participant: Field Notes from Here and Now, p.41.

“Our local forests are full of large rocks. I can’t help but climb over them, jump from one to another, and enjoy the view they provide. Early in Luke, I read that God can turn stones into children of Abraham. In the next chapter, the Devil tells Jesus to turn stones into bread. I live in the twenty-first century. I know that of all that has been discovered about them, stones are not likely to turn into children or turn into bread. Yet I sit on a large rock in the forest and am reminded by the Gospel during Lent that I live in a world that is not limited by what we think we might know in this century.”

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“I cannot read Acts without getting the impression that conflict, persecution, and catastrophe are opportunities. This is counter intuitive. We would like to believe that peace, comfort, and worry free moments are the times when we can best organize effectively and therefore prosper. Acts may suggest that times of comfort and prosperity bring with them a lack of urgency and intensity and priority. Without apology, Acts continues to present challenging situations. Without exception, Acts reports that the good news continued to spread. Acts leaves us with the impression that our writings, stories, and growth are strengthened during less fortunate situations.”

from Participant: Field Notes from Here and Now, p. 103

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“Trinity confronts us with something we cannot manage. We do not meet this God on our terms. We cannot reduce the mystery of God to something we can use or understand. Instead, we discover a lively, revealing, demanding presence. In the Trinity we are faced with the reality that we are not in control.”

from Participant: Field Notes from Here and Now

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“Trinity gives us a fuller picture of God. Yet – whether Speaking Creator God hovering over the waters, Son of God rising from the dead, or Holy Spirit descending from heaven with a rushing mighty wind – there is still an element of mystery. Trinity reminds us we will never know all there is to know about God.”

From Participant: Field Notes from Here and Now, p. 110

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“I can’t help but notice a distinct pattern in this relationship between Creator and creation. The Creator keeps showing up, again and again, unwilling to let creation go. So we celebrate His arrival as a Middle Eastern baby. We celebrate His return from the dead. We celebrate His arrival as Spirit. This Creator seems willing to show up anywhere at any time. This is a persistent God. It is clear He is unwilling to give up on us.”

From Participant: Field Notes from Here and Now, p. 99

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