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Posts Tagged ‘politic’

It is unfortunate the church continues to be full of voices and rhetoric that sound a lot like American politics.  It is not uncommon for someone to state a preferred political position, add scripture or a theological point, and act as if it is the same as gospel. This raises many questions. One of them, “Is it ok to lean on existing political structures?” And if it is, “How do we know when it is appropriate?” Further, “How do we recognize when we have simply become another voice that supports an existing political structure?”

I was reminded recently that there are very blurry lines in parts of the church regarding this conversation. Some obviously believe a call to activism is the same as the gospel. There are benefits to activism. It shines light on a cause. The world is a better place because of the efforts of some activists. Because of the social good that can come from it, it is no surprise to find Christians participating in some of these efforts. Yet, we must remember that our moral causes and efforts in the culture wars are not the same as the gospel.

We can celebrate when government makes changes for moral reasons. But we must be clear, we are people who live by God’s Good News whether government declares it legal or not. We are not dependent on the government for social good. The world will never be made right by government intervention or hashtag movements. In fact, our moral causes and activism can become distractions that prevent us from demonstrating gospel.

The hope of the world is not dependent on political structures. A church that has become dependent on political structures ceases to be the church. It is the gathering, loving, grace-giving, sending people of God who demonstrate what hope looks like. How will the world ever know the ways of God without a people called church? We know that God so loved the world. We demonstrate that love best through the ways of God and not by the ways of the world.

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Religion’s fascination with earth’s politics is not new. Reinhold Niebuhr writes about a Dr. Frank Buchman, an evangelist who founded the Oxford Group. He was quoted, after returning from Europe, as saying “I thank heaven for a man like Adolf Hitler, who built a front-line defense against the anti-Christ of communism… My barber in London told me Hitler saved all Europe from communism… Think what it would mean to the world if Hitler surrendered to the control of God… Through such a man God could control a nation overnight and solve every last bewildering problem”

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A New Game in Town

I have run across an interesting quote from Peter Leithart from his book Against Christianity. Get a load of this;

“So long as the church preaches the gospel and functions as a properly ‘political’ reality, a polity of her own, the kings of the earth have a problem on their hands… As soon as the church appears, it becomes clear to any alert politician that worldly politics is no longer the only game in town. The introduction of the church into any city means that the city has a challenger within its walls.”

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Our politics have little to do with whether retail stores allow employees to wish consumers a Merry Christmas or allow the Salvation Army to ring out front or whether the court house will permit a nativity scene on the premises. For the church to expect Target or the court house or the president to communicate Christmas for us is simply ridiculous. I suspect the principalities and powers are pleased when we become so dependent on them. And if our witness hinges on retailers or elected officials, we have bigger problems than we care to admit.

The politics of Christmas are much bigger than such things. The fifth verse of the Gospel of Luke starts it off. “In the days of Herod, king of Judea.” So it begins. On the stage of local politics, John the Baptizer is conceived and born.

Meanwhile, there is something even bigger going on. Jesus is conceived and his mother Mary begins talking about politics. She tells us that when God’s kingdom promises are complete, people will have enough food. She tells us about a kingdom where the rich and powerful will no longer exploit the weak and poor. Mary makes claims of a new kingdom before the king is even born.

And then, on the stage of world politics where Caesar Augustus ruled, Jesus is born. Luke may be implying that while John was to have a significant local impact among Jews in Judea, Jesus will have a worldwide impact for all people.

And before we think the politics are out of the way, Luke chapter three begins with a list of politicians. It was “the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar.” (Just an observation, Augustus didn’t last long). “Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea… Herod was tetrarch of Galilee… Philip was tetrarch of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitus… Lysanias was tetrarch of Abilene” and the high priesthood included “Annas and Caiaphas.” Whew!

We can be certain that both local and worldwide politics provide settings for what follows. It also becomes obvious that wherever one turns they are faced with the politics of the world. Everyone in the story is surrounded by the world’s power. That is when “the word of God came to John.” And among the verbal clutter of all those political voices, came “The voice of one crying in the wilderness.”

Its on. Luke wants to make sure we know early in the gospel story that our politics are counter to the politics of the world. So, we are told that one of those listed politicians, Herod, had enough of John’s counter political preaching and locked him in prison. If nothing else, this reminds us there is much more at stake than we may first suspect.

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We have been gathering on Wednesdays to read the Old Testament book of Daniel. Together, we are asking questions of the text, engaging the text, and trying to discern what the text means for a church in the twenty-first century. Surprisingly, Daniel does not encourage a particular diet or give tips on dream interpretation. Here are some things that Daniel does seem interested in;

1, the state wants us to become good citizens of the state, the state is uninterested in making disciples for Jesus.

2, it is not only a Babylonian notion to acknowledge God as a prop for the state.

3, exile continues to be a good metaphor for where we live and how we are to live today.

4, catering to a culture of power, control, and unrealistic perspectives of self can drive one to insanity.

5, it is possible to live in a pagan culture without becoming tainted by it.

6, we should care about rulers and pray for them. We should appeal to their humanness, not their sinfulness.

7, rulers and governments will continue to come and go – only God remains eternal.

8, God is ruler over kings, nations, and history.

9, the wisdom of God is superior to human wisdom, even the best Babylon has to offer.

10, God has always been a delivering, saving God.

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A host of preachers gathered at the Festival of Homiletics last week. Held in Washington D. C., it was appropriately themed “Politics and Preaching.” The festival was a weeklong series of worship and preaching and lecture. Much of our time was spent exploring the politics of the church, especially as the church responds to the politics of the world. While it was a conference about preaching for preachers, it also revealed the pulse of a significant part of the church at this point in time.

You can recognize the effort given the task at hand by some of the titles presented at the conference. “Politics of Pneuma,” “Preaching: It’s Always Political,” “Preaching to Save the Soul of the Nation,” Politics, Powers, Perils, and Pretenders,” “The Biblical Politics of Gratitude,” and “Pledging Allegiance.” There was no shortage of pointing out the systemic problems of society and ways the current political climate contributes.

Even while engaged in a strong effort, it is difficult to resist the temptation to twist the gospel into shapes that fit the story we already live in. Those who are content find it easy to ask God to bless what is going on, while those who are displeased have tendencies to call for societal change. We all have tendencies to request a word from the Lord while depending on the current political system for our salvation. On any given day we might become convinced that salvation will be attained through American politics.

The dangers of this are obvious. Slipping into partisan thinking will guarantee defensive posturing and finger pointing that result in fracturing and polarizing the body of Christ. This is an obvious departure from the politics of the kingdom. Severe division, name calling, nor alliances with Caesar are the ways of God.

The New Testament does tell of people whose politics permitted them to go to great lengths to protect their way of thinking. They were willing to go against the ways of God to protect the ways of God. It seems that zealots are alive and well in the church. Who knew that when we desire to preach the politics of Jesus it would be so easy to drift into the ways of the world? The people of God need to behave as one in Christ, no matter what our persuasion might be in lesser politics.

Listening to well-meaning preachers trying to wrestle with these issues remind us of the reality of the tension. Despite our desire to be true to kingdom politics, it is still easy to appeal to the existing structures as the way to a remedy. But to establish an alliance with the current system is only to continue the status quo. Changing which party holds the power is not the same as gospel.

It is unfortunate for the church to use the same hermeneutics as CNN and Fox News. It is not good practice to interpret the good news through a lens that strengthens some partisan story. We cannot be faithful to our calling by throwing affirmation to crowds of likeminded people. We cannot be the blessing we are supposed to be by endorsing the existing false narratives that are on the way out.

This all leads to the question – “why is the church so inclined to align itself with dominant culture?” Liberals and conservatives are both guilty of compromise by adjusting belief and behavior in order to support the power of the establishment when it fits the story we think we belong to. I am reminded that French sociologist Jacques Ellul warned “Politics is the church’s worst problem.” He goes on, “It is her constant temptation, the occasion of her greatest disasters, the trap continually set for her by the prince of this world.” To claim to believe that Jesus is King and then put our marbles in with the political structure is a tad contradictory if not hypocritical.

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We are brought together by a God who is bigger than any petty differences. We are family. We carry the news that can save the world. Yet, we still fall for the voices of culture. We not only listen to them, we hold them in high esteem. And it divides us. Our news has always been clear that the ways of the world are unable to save the world. Yet we continue to act as if they can.

It is no easy task to resist the pressures of culture. It has always been difficult to resist principalities and powers. Yet, this is not optional. When we give in to cultural pressures we choose sides and we become divided. We choose lesser, artificial, and temporary ideas about important things like salvation and community. And our choices lead to partisanship in the body.

Interestingly, the word evangelical has become news. And not the news the word evangelical is intended or accustomed to sharing. Flip on the television and find someone trying to convince you that evangelicals are an important voice in the current political landscape. Turn the channel and find someone trying to convince you evangelicals are irrational, hateful and a cancer. Whenever we begin to listen to these voices as a voice for us we are mistaken. Spoiler alert, these voices are not neutral. They say what they say to pander to whoever they think is listening.

The president has become part of the “evangelical” news. And the voices of culture are attempting to draw a line and put you on one side or the other. It is true the president has said some rash things. The president has made some ill-advised decisions. But it isn’t the president’s behavior that worries me most. It is ours. The bickering that is going on inside the church only lends credibility to the misguided ideas that salvation will come through Washington D. C. and our allegiance depends on which side of the aisle we are on.

The church is not a political action committee. This is no lobby group. Perhaps the democrats and republicans are less evil than the Nazi’s, but to align ourselves with either of them is just as bad. We already have a King. And we’ve already been told there is no room for two masters.

Participate in elections. Encourage elected officials. Pray for them. But do not bow at their altars. When you agree with politicians and when you disagree – God is still at work. Even more, God is still in control. And when you start to believe otherwise, you are worshiping at the wrong altar.

It is time to stop participating in the divisive strategies of the world. The fact is, we cannot repair what is severed on our own. We need God. We must learn to listen, learn to disagree, and learn to resist in ways that are faithful. The church must stand together and recognize the opportunity right here in front of us.

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