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Posts Tagged ‘the legend of sleepy hollow’

To continue the theme of adding some culture to this blog, here are some classic excerpts from another story to be told as the days become colder. There is a tale discovered among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker that is told often at this time of year. It took place on “a fine autumnal day.” We are told;

“The sky was clear and serene, and nature wore that rich and golden livery which we always associate with the idea of abundance. The forests had put on their somber brown and yellow, while some trees of the tenderer kind had been nipped by the frosts into brilliant dyes of orange, purple, and scarlet.”

This tale includes a night of “merry-making” that took place at the Van Tassel mansion. It was quite a night. In fact, most of the tale takes place on this one night. It started with a festive atmosphere.

“There was the doughty doughnut, the tender oly koek, and the crisp and crumbling cruller; sweet cakes and short cakes, ginger cakes and honey cakes, and the whole family of cakes.”

Several of those at the Van Tassel’s were;

“Doling out their wild and wonderful legends. Many dismal tales were told about funeral trains, and mourning cries and wailings heard and seen about the great tree where the unfortunate Major Andre was taken… Some mention was made also of the woman in white, that haunted the dark glen at Raven Rock, and was often heard to shriek on winter nights before a storm, having perished there in the snow. The chief part of the stories, however, turned upon the favorite spectre of Sleepy Hollow, the Headless Horseman, who had been heard several times of late, patrolling the country; and, it was said, tethered his horse nightly among the graves in the churchyard.”

We have Washington Irving to thank for this enjoyable prose. That is, all of us except for one Ichabod Crane. As the story goes, the night turned for the worse for Mr. Crane.

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